Securing WordPress with AppArmor

WordPress is a very popular CMS. According to one report, 30% of websites use WordPress, which is an impressive feat.

Despite this popularity, WordPress is built upon PHP which is often lacking in the security department. Add to this that the user that runs the webserver often has a fair bit of access and there is no distinguishing between the webserver code and the WordPress code and you set yourself up for troubles.

So, let’s introduce something that not only can tell the difference between Apache running and WordPress running under it, but also limit what WordPress can access.

As the AppArmor wiki says “AppArmor is Mandatory Access Control (MAC) like security system for Linux. AppArmor confines individual programs to a set of files, capabilities, network access and rlimits…”.  AppArmor also has this concept of hats, so your webserver code (e.g. apache) can be one hat with one policy but the WordPress PHP code has another hat and therefore another policy. For some reason, AppArmor calls a policy a profile, so wherever you see profile translate that to policy.

The idea here is to limit what WordPress can access down to the files and directories it needs, and nothing more. What follows is how I have setup my system but you may need to tweak it, especially for some plugins.

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