WordPress 5.2.4

Hot on the heels of WordPress version 5.2.3 which fixed a bunch of stuff we have WordPress 5.2.4 with fixes for six security issues. There is a certain trick to matching up what the WordPress Blog thinks has been fixed and the changsets between the old version and the new. The curious thing is there

WordPress 5.1.1

The Debian packages for WordPress version 5.1.1 are being updated as I write this. This is a security fix for WordPress that stops comments causing a cross-site scripting bug. It’s an important one to update. The backports should happen soon so even if you are using Debian stable you’ll be covered.

WordPress 5.0.1

While I missed the WordPress 5.0 release, it was only a few more days before there was a security release out. So WordPress 5.0.1 will be available in Debian soon. This is both a security update from 5.0.1 and a huge feature update from the 4.9.x versions to the 5.0 versions. The WordPress website, in

Padlock with Wordpress logo in the unlocked position

Securing WordPress with AppArmor

WordPress is a very popular CMS. According to one report, 30% of websites use WordPress, which is an impressive feat.

Despite this popularity, WordPress is built upon PHP which is often lacking in the security department. Add to this that the user that runs the webserver often has a fair bit of access and there is no distinguishing between the webserver code and the WordPress code and you set yourself up for troubles.

So, let’s introduce something that not only can tell the difference between Apache running and WordPress running under it, but also limit what WordPress can access.

As the AppArmor wiki says “AppArmor is Mandatory Access Control (MAC) like security system for Linux. AppArmor confines individual programs to a set of files, capabilities, network access and rlimits…”.  AppArmor also has this concept of hats, so your webserver code (e.g. apache) can be one hat with one policy but the WordPress PHP code has another hat and therefore another policy. For some reason, AppArmor calls a policy a profile, so wherever you see profile translate that to policy.

The idea here is to limit what WordPress can access down to the files and directories it needs, and nothing more. What follows is how I have setup my system but you may need to tweak it, especially for some plugins.

Debian, WordPress and Multi-site

For quite some time, the Debian version of WordPress has had a configuration tweak that made it possible to run multiple websites on the same server. This came from a while ago when multi-site wasn’t available. While a useful feature, it does make the initial setup of WordPress for simple sites more complicated.

I’m looking at changing the Debian package slightly so that for a single-site use it Just Works. I have also looked into the way WordPress handles the content, especially themes and plugins, to see if there is a way of updating them through the website itself. This probably won’t suit everyone but I think its a better default.