Step or Sloping Graphs

Even though the backend of Rosenberg NMS uses rrdtool RRD files, the front end graphs are created using jqPlot.  The idea is to have a set of templates for the different types of graphs and just apply them to the various data sets.  It makes things a lot simpler for new graphs because you just select which one you want; unless you want something a lot different which would involve a new graph template.

In any case, anyone that looks enough at the standard rrdtool graphs will know they are a series of steps. While it depends on the RRA, usually they are 5 minute steps, so a graph showing an increasing rate might show 5 minutes of 2 Mbps and then the next 5 minutes of 11 Mbps. jqPlot graphs as I’ve currently got them draws a line between two data points, so there would be a sloping line starting at 2.5 minutes (half of the first 5 minute interval) and 2Mbps sloping up to 11 Mbps at 7.5 minutes.

At first I thought this was wrong and spent some time attempting to “fix” the graph by making it look like a rrdtool graph more. Someway through that process I stopped and wondered, what IS the right way? The answer like a lot of other things, is “it depends”.

For a graph showing a rate, such as the output bits per second on an interface, the way this is done is at regular intervals a counter is measured. So if at time 0 the counter is 140 and time 60 the counter is 200 and finally at time 120 the counter is at 800 there has been an average rate of 1 [(200-140)/60] and 100 [(800-200)/60)]. rrdtool would show a horizontal bar at 1 bps and then another horizontal bar at 100 at the next time interval. jqPlot would show a sloping line going from 30,1 up to 90,100.

Two graphs looking very different from the same data, what gives?  Each graph is right, or rather is showing an estimation of different things, hence their differences.

rrdtool is showing the average rate for that time period. It is in some ways accurate because leaving aside missed wrap-arounds and resets that many bits did pass through that interface for the time specified.  However often the graphs are interpreted incorrectly as the real rate and not an average.  We can be reasonably sure for a rate that it would not be 1 for exactly a minute and then immediately jump to 100 for another minute.  This isn’t rrdtool’s fault, it is just how the graphs can be interpreted.

jqplot will show more “realistic” graphs, with a curve sloping up. However this too makes assumptions that the rate increase is linear which often it is not. It just gives the illusion that the graph knows more about the data than it really does.

In the end, both graphs are at the same time accurate and misleading. It’s important when looking at any graph in general (not just these two types) that you understand its limits and assumptions.  To give one example of the problems that can be missed, traffic interfaces may have microbursts (large amount of traffic in short amount of time) which, due to the averaging that goes on in graphing are invisible to graphs and give an incorrect account of what is going on.

 

 

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jqplot in Turbogears

 

I’ve been working on the Rosenberg jqPlot GraphsNMS graphs slowly migrating them from using rrdtool graph and using jqplot.  While there have been many false-starts and re-works, I now have a working set of graphs, two of which are shown on the page.

The graphs look a lot slicker and I have also simplified the admin screens.  I found I kept having to type the same thing in over and over for the rrdgraphs and have narrowed down the type of graphs to approximately 5.  They’re certainly not bulletproof and need more testing but they’re a good start.

The graphs are based upon the ToscaWidgets2 series of widgets that then provide a nice “handle” for the jqPlot code.  My graphs even have some hand-coded Javascript to give nice units on the Y axis.

 

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First Look at RoseNMS screens

More work has gone into the various GUI screens for RoseNMS. While still early days, these screenshots give an idea of the final program.

Host Map

The maps have been updated and now just use CSS for layout, rather than hard calculating the coordinates using javascript. This gives a cleaner and more fluid look to the maps. Hovering over the map item will show more details about the item. There are maps for hosts (shown) as well as attributes.

Attribute View with information, graph and events
Attribute View with information, graph and events

Attribute details show some information about the attribute, the default graph and the events. Clicking on the more button above the graph takes you to the graph page for that attribute.

Graphs

Finally the graph handling is completely re-written with the concept of graph templates. These are basic types of graphs. The one shown is the basic “lines” template that shows… lines! Only things required are the RRD data source, the multiplier, the legend and how you want the units shown. From that the program builds all the required VDEFs and CDEFs.

python and rrdtool

RRDTool is a neat utility for collecting and graphing statistics such as server loads or network traffic. There are two main modules for interfacing with RRDTool files within python; rrdpython and pyrrd.

rrdpython is the basic bindings of the rrdtool library within python. The API is very familiar for people who program in C or use the command line tools which for me is both so it works well. However if you were expecting a “pythonic” API you will be disappointed. As there is the direct binding, you have to have either a pre-compiled module or compile it yourself with librrd-dev package installed. Depending on your setup this could be trivial or a real pain.

pyrrd initially looks good as it is a object-orientated style and (supposedly) a pure python code, so no trying to compile things… but!

Well, the problem is its not pure python. The hooks are there for it (in backend.py) for it to be implemented in python but it falls back to using the external method, and external method is a bunch of Popen calls. pyrrd also does not
support the full set of rrdtool commands.

My intention is to keep using rrdpython despite the compile hassle and possibly even use a fancier graph setup such as High Charts though there is a problem with their license for me.

PHP floats and locales

I recently had a bug report in JFFNMS that the SLA checks were failing with bizarre calculations.  Things like 300% disk drive utilization and the like.  Briefly, JFFNMS is written in PHP and checks values that come out of rrdtool and makes various comparisons like have you used more than 80% of your disk or have there been too many errors.

The logs showed strange input variables coming in, all were integers below 10.  I don’t know of many 1 or 3 kB sized disk drives. What was going on?  I ran a rrdtool fetch command on the relevant file and got output of something like 1,780000e+07 which for an 18GB drive seemed ok. Notice the comma, in this locale that’s a decimal point… hmm.

In lib/api.rrdtool.inc.php there is this line around the rrdtool_fetch area:

$value[] = ($line1[$i]=="nan")?0:(float)$line1[$i];

A quick check and I was finding that my 1,7…e+07 was coming back as 1.  We had a float conversion problem.  Or more specifically, php has a float conversion problem.  I built a small check script like the following:

setlocale(LC_NUMERIC,'pl_PL.UTF-8');
$linfo = localeconv();
$pi='3,14';
print "Decimal is "$linfo[decimal_point]". Pi is $pi and ".(float)($pi)."n";
print "Half is ".(1/2)."n";

Which gave the output of:

Decimal is “,”. Pi is 3,14 and 3

Half is 0,5

So… PHP is saying that decimal point is a comma and it uses it BUT if a string comes in with a comma, its not a decimal point. Really?? Are they serious here?  I tried various combinations and could not make it parse correctly.

The fix was made easier for me because I know rrdtool fetch only outputs values in scientific notation. That means if there is a string with a comma, then it must be a decimal point as it could never be used for a thousands mark.  By using str_replace to replace any comma with a period the code worked again and didn’t even need the locale to be set correctly, or that the locale for the shell where rrdtool is run is the same as the locale in php.

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